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Author Topic: Air conditions  (Read 435 times)
Rayblon
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« on: March 17, 2017, 05:11:26 PM »

So, I was thinking... What if the air had modifiers?

I suppose the smell mechanic would already function like that, but it can be made more significant, giving you an immediate reason to pay it heed rather than just when hunting for a specific plant, or when you think you're being trailed. Right now (as I understand it, again), smell is nonessential, it's usable to track objects, animals, and people in some capacity, but that's about it. While it can communicate immediate danger sometimes, what if we allowed the smell itself to be the immediate danger?

For instance, miasma could be one of the air states, and would introduce a higher chance for infection or plague as well as smelling terrible.

More interestingly, you could expand this concept to restrict the spread of certain plants and animals and create codependency. For instance, Tembra(the black mold I discussed that would destroy crops, claim houses, etc) might develop large sporangiums that burst after a while and dump out groups of mobile slime or perhaps imp-like creatures that are dependent on the toxic air surrounding the mold to survive.

In caves, if you don't create an air source using subterranean plants, you might run out of air and begin suffocating, slowly but surely. Perhaps you end up hitting a pocket of sulphuric air due to a nearby volcanic vent that inhibits your vision as well as being toxic. Maybe you hit a flammable air pocket, that will ignite and cause the entire mine to go up in flames from an errant spark while mining if you don't let it air out first. There could also be a sadder aspect of this. Perhaps some subterranean creatures dependent on a certain type of air can be uncovered, but at the cost of causing their air to be siphoned off in exchange for oxygen and slowly killing them if you don't do anything. This would introduce a particular challenge, too. Subterranean communities and homes deep underground would need to develop sophisticated ventilation systems. Perhaps certain infections, plagues, or symbiotes could switch around the type of air you can breathe, too, making you entirely dependent on a certain air type if left untreated.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 05:20:57 PM by Rayblon » Logged


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Duff_Beer
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2017, 09:32:36 PM »

I cant speak for most of it, but the underground or cave based air breathing issues seems easy to fix.
Mine a hole to the surface and put a grate over it so people don't fall in.

Or build some sort of underground air piping system like old fashioned stoves used to have.

Doesn't seem that difficult to me.
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Rayblon
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2017, 11:52:08 PM »

I cant speak for most of it, but the underground or cave based air breathing issues seems easy to fix.
Mine a hole to the surface and put a grate over it so people don't fall in.

Or build some sort of underground air piping system like old fashioned stoves used to have.

Doesn't seem that difficult to me.

Trouble is, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and pretty much everything heavier than oxygen are going to want to go as low as possible... That's why hitting a gas vent underground is super dangerous.
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Duff_Beer
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2017, 03:40:03 AM »

I cant speak for most of it, but the underground or cave based air breathing issues seems easy to fix.
Mine a hole to the surface and put a grate over it so people don't fall in.

Or build some sort of underground air piping system like old fashioned stoves used to have.

Doesn't seem that difficult to me.

Trouble is, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and pretty much everything heavier than oxygen are going to want to go as low as possible... That's why hitting a gas vent underground is super dangerous.

Hitting a gas vent or anything around it would be dangerous cause gas vents are usually so deep into the ground that it's difficult to dig out before you suffocate on the fumes. Or if you hit the vent itself by accident, you'll get a facefull of fumes and die.
Or if you try to dig out, you risk igniting a spark in the process from your tools scrapping against something and turning the whole cavern into a giant fireball.

That about what your trying to say?
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Rayblon
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2017, 05:25:49 PM »

Think of it like oil and water. Oil, breathable air, floats on top of water, the toxic heavier air. Water stays at the bottom of a cave system, pushing the oil up unless there's a pump to keep the oil flowing into the deeper parts of the cave.Wikipedia has a great article on it. In order to avoid air toxicity in a mineyou need an active ventilation system like a fan.
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Duff_Beer
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2017, 11:07:02 PM »

Think of it like oil and water. Oil, breathable air, floats on top of water, the toxic heavier air. Water stays at the bottom of a cave system, pushing the oil up unless there's a pump to keep the oil flowing into the deeper parts of the cave.Wikipedia has a great article on it. In order to avoid air toxicity in a mineyou need an active ventilation system like a fan.

So the only difference here I see from what I suggested, after having viewed that link, is that the "shaft" or as I suggested, a large pipe,
seems to have been burrowed down from the surface somehow and managed to locate the right spot it needed to, to be able to hit the mine filled with the gas. Instead of the miners digging up and risking sparking something with their tools.

Putting a fan within said shaft might help if it is allowed in this game. Not sure if they had fans in medieval times. But still, a good idea regardless.
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Rayblon
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2017, 04:23:23 PM »

Think of it like oil and water. Oil, breathable air, floats on top of water, the toxic heavier air. Water stays at the bottom of a cave system, pushing the oil up unless there's a pump to keep the oil flowing into the deeper parts of the cave.Wikipedia has a great article on it. In order to avoid air toxicity in a mineyou need an active ventilation system like a fan.

So the only difference here I see from what I suggested, after having viewed that link, is that the "shaft" or as I suggested, a large pipe,
seems to have been burrowed down from the surface somehow and managed to locate the right spot it needed to, to be able to hit the mine filled with the gas.

...

Putting a fan within said shaft might help if it is allowed in this game. Not sure if they had fans in medieval times. But still, a good idea regardless.

The fan is required for it to work. No fan = gas stays there forever because gravity. There are a great many different types of toxic and caustic cocktails of gasses, which are known as damp in mining terms. Oscillating fans were only just created in the 19th century, but a manual or magnetically powered engine connected to a fan wouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility.
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